Native vs Hybrid vs Mobile Web Apps

Native vs Hybrid vs Mobile Web Apps
Jan 23

A responsive website can offer the same functionality as an app. With a creative approach, you can keep the distinctions between a web app and a native or hybrid app to a minimum, and can even ensure that the home page opens in full-screen mode.

 

Web apps are limited in terms of what features they can effectively implement, however, and they always need an internet connection to work properly. They are also slower than native apps, and are less intuitive.  

 

That said, with a mobile website it is much easier to deliver updates, making businesses more responsive and flexible. Changing the design or content of a mobile website consists of publishing your edits once, after which they’ll be immediately visible to all users; updating a native or hybrid app requires publishing the update to the respective app stores and undergoing validation procedures before finally delivering the update to your users.

 

Native, hybrid, or mobile web? For companies that build mobile apps, that is the million-dollar question.

So what is the right choice? It depends. There’s no single correct approach that can be applied in every situation. Each option (native, hybrid, and mobile web) has its pros and cons. If you still have questions about what type of app is right for you, please contact us at info@archer-soft.com.We will be glad to help you choose the best option for your business.

When you decide to develop a mobile application, you’re instantly faced with a lot of lingo. ‘Native applications,’ hybrid applications,’ and ‘web applications’ are three of the common terms you’ll encounter. But what do they mean? And, most importantly: Which is most suitable for your business goals and your product?

 

For starters, these three types of applications are differentiated by the technologies used to develop them:

 

  • Native applications are written for a certain mobile platform (iOS or Android) using the development tools and language that the given platform supports (e.g. Objective-C or Swift for iOS, Java for Android). As a rule, native apps perform better than hybrid or web apps on mobile devices.

  • Hybrid applications are made by embedding HTML5 applications inside a native container, combining elements of both native and HTML5 apps.

  • Web applications use standard web technologies: typically HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS. You can develop them once and they’ll work on multiple devices. While you can create complicated apps with HTML5 and JavaScript alone, some vital limitations remain, specifically with regard to session management, secure offline storage, and access to native device functionality (cameras, calendars, geolocation, etc.)

Native appsare usually developed within an integrated development environment (IDE). IDEs provide tools for debugging, project management, version control, and other tasks that professional developers need to complete. While iOS and Android applications are developed using different IDEs and languages, there are a lot of similarities in their development environments, and there’s not much reason to go into the differences.

 

There are several advantages to writing apps in a platform-specific language using an IDE:

  • Native apps offer the fastest, most reliable and most responsive user experience.

  • Native apps have deeper access to device hardware, including cameras, and accelerometers. This allows for significant performance optimization, especially if hardware is used extensively.

  • App owners can make use of push notifications, alerting users when a new piece of content is published or when they need to perform some action.

 

If your budget allows, native apps are the ideal variant, offering the best user experience. But when you build an app from scratch – and when multi-platform support is key – be aware that this can also be the most expensive option. A good developer or agency can easily quote between $25,000 to $50,000 for a custom native app built from the ground up. You must then multiply that by the number of platforms you need to cover, considering that nowadays it’s almost necessary to build for both iOS and Android.

In most cases, a business will not need a native app, however, unless their app requires extensive device resources – graphics for games, image processing, or photo filters, for instance. Hybrid and mobile web apps can handle almost everything, and cost less.

 

Hybrid apps work on multiple platforms. They’re developed with a single standard programming language (or a combination of HTML5, Javascript, and CSS) and then packaged for each unique platform. Devices with specific interactions – such as Apple Watch – can be supported by plugins for each operating system.

One of the biggest advantages of hybrid applications is that they let you support multiple operating systems for a far lower price than you would pay to develop multiple native apps. And if the hybrid app is developed correctly, users will not even know that the app isn’t native. End users don’t care about development methods and processes – they just want the app to work properly on their devices.

A responsive website can offer the same functionality as an app. With a creative approach, you can keep the distinctions between a web app and a native or hybrid app to a minimum, and can even ensure that the home page opens in full-screen mode.

 

Web apps are limited in terms of what features they can effectively implement, however, and they always need an internet connection to work properly. They are also slower than native apps, and are less intuitive.  

 

That said, with a mobile website it is much easier to deliver updates, making businesses more responsive and flexible. Changing the design or content of a mobile website consists of publishing your edits once, after which they’ll be immediately visible to all users; updating a native or hybrid app requires publishing the update to the respective app stores and undergoing validation procedures before finally delivering the update to your users.

 

Native, hybrid, or mobile web? For companies that build mobile apps, that is the million-dollar question.

So what is the right choice? It depends. There’s no single correct approach that can be applied in every situation. Each option (native, hybrid, and mobile web) has its pros and cons. If you still have questions about what type of app is right for you, please contact us at info@archer-soft.com.We will be glad to help you choose the best option for your business.

 

 

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